Trend Watch May 2020

Podcast by Two Urban Designers – From Shopping Malls to Coronavirus:

Adelaide (un)Planned is a slick and engaging podcast exploring design and planning in Adelaide, South Australia – the good, bad and (sometimes) ugly. What is it that makes this city one of the most liveable in the world?

Presented by Michael McKeown, Director and Urban Designer at Jensen PLUS, and Daniel Bennett, Urban Design Strategy Lead with Architectus, the podcast has recently celebrated its tenth episode.

Each instalment features conversations with some of Adelaide’s leading thinkers, planners and design professionals, selected for their opinions, insights, stories and good humour.

Expect discussion about well-known and changing places, streets and developments, and topical chats about landscape, transport, the environment and civic leadership.

We recommend starting with episode seven, Coronavirus and the City, Part 1. Michael and Daniel discuss what Adelaide may learn from the pandemic – will our local shops be revitalised by the ‘great work from home experiment’ and a return to localism? What can we take from the increased use of parks and many public spaces? Will there really be a return to suburban values and gardening?

Our Cities May Never Look the Same Again After the Pandemic:

Cities are introducing public space interventions to attempt to control the spread of Covid-19. It is unclear if these initiatives will continue once the pandemic is over, and what the virus means for planning ideals of connected community places with ‘sticky’ streets, writes Oscar Holland for CNN.

“For advocates of walkable, unpolluted and vehicle-free cities, the past few weeks have offered an unprecedented opportunity to test the ideas they have long lobbied for,” he writes.

“With Covid-19 lockdowns vastly reducing the use of roads and public transit systems, city authorities — from Liverpool to Lima — are taking advantage by closing streets to cars, opening others to bicycles and widening sidewalks to help residents maintain the six-foot distancing recommended by global health authorities.”

Holland highlights examples of how cities are currently reshaping public spaces – at least in the short term – and explores implications for future city design and planning.

Read the article, ‘Our cities may never look the same again after the pandemic.’

Photo: New York City’s Domino Park and San Francisco’s Mission Dolores Park now have marked circles to encourage proper social distancing. Source: Internewscast.


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recent news

7 Ways to Activate Streets

As the value of public spaces comes into focus, this article shares seven case studies of street furniture being used to help improve community wellbeing. Both tactical pop-ups and permanent installations are featured below, with examples of projects that foster community engagement and measure social impact. Street Furniture Australia products have been tried-and-tested to activate spaces and deliver results. Select from our range to bring life, joy and comfort to your community. Case 1. Creating Millions of Smiles Woden Experiment was a six-month prototype installation by the ACT Government that aimed to bring life, joy and comfort to Canberra’s Woden Town Square. Brightly coloured seats and tables were configured in random positions to create a casual and welcoming vibe. Community interviews, observations and workshops were at the heart of this …

  • 26 may 2020
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Wood Without Worry

Aluminium woodgrain, also known as ‘Wood Without Worry,’ provides the warm look of timber – retained over time – with the minimal maintenance requirements of powder coated aluminium. Where timber requires oiling every three months to keep it at its best, simply wipe down woodgrain aluminium with a clean, damp cloth every few months as required. See the new Wood Without Worry brochure. Enquire Now Select from five beautiful shades of wood: dark to light and cool to warm. Some Wood Without Worry battens require end caps. If this is the case, you may choose to match the end cap with the colour of the frame or batten. case studies Warm Tones Helping clients achieve a low maintenance, warm colour palette. Moore Street, Canberra by NettleonTribe.Aria Seat (CMA1) and Simple …

  • 1 jul 2020
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Trend Watch August 2020

Designing streets for kids: Released in August by the Global Designing Cities Initiative, “Designing Streets for Kids,” offers strategies and solutions to redesign urban streets and public spaces by focusing on the needs of kids and caregivers, with the goal of making streets beautiful, fun – and safe. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for young people ages 5-29 globally, and traffic congestion and vehicles contribute to high levels of air pollution, which is responsible for the death of 127,000 children under the age of five each year, the guide’s authors said. Many of these deaths, they said, can be dramatically reduced through kid-friendly street design. Read the Forbes article, How to Make Streets Kid-Friendly by Tanya Mohn. Image: A street in Fortaleza, Brazil, designed according to ‘Designing Streets …

  • 27 aug 2020
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related news

Trend Watch April 2020

Is Play a Cure for Loneliness? Communities that connect through play are well-placed to support each other in times of crisis writes Alison Stenning, Professor of Geography at Newcastle University and play streets activist, for The Developer. Stenning has published a report looking at the benefits of organised neighbourhood play sessions in the UK grassroots movement Playing Out, where streets are temporarily closed for games and chalk drawing. “Playing out’ is not just about play and not just for children,” she writes, as neighbours of all ages are encouraged to participate and form new relationships with others who live on their street. “These new connections enable and are reinforced by a proliferation of contact between neighbours outside of street play sessions. Neighbours lend and borrow equipment, ingredients, and occasionally money. …

  • 8 apr 2020
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Trend Watch March 2020

Eerily Empty Public Spaces During Coronavirus: The Atlantic has published a gallery of eerie images from around the world, showing what happens when quarantine measures and self-isolation keeps everyone at home. Here are just some of the images, taken between February 21 and March 9, 2020: Top photo: Friday prayers with very slim attendance at the Kaaba in Mecca’s Grand Mosque, March 6 2020. Go to The Atlantic’s full gallery. Paris Mayor Calls for 15-Minute City: In her re-election campaign Mayor Anne Hidalgo proposes plans to ensure that every Paris resident can meet their essential needs within a short walk or bike ride, writes Feargus O’Sullivan forCity Lab. Mixing many uses within the same space challenges much of the planning status quo of the past century, O’Sullivan writes. It once …

  • 13 mar 2020
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Trend Watch February 2020

Could city parklands be used to house endangered fauna? UNSW students have proposed to create research and veterinary labs for native bats, birds and eels. Restored patches of habitat in Sydney’s Centennial Parklands could become sanctuaries for threatened species, they say. The proposal come from a two-week Sydney Urban Lab studio in January, overseen by US-based landscape architect Professor Richard Weller and Hassell. “In the case of Sydney, we decided to get a list of the species endangered both in the city and its region and the broader hotspot, which is really the eastern portion of Australia, and ask the question: could we take a piece of land in Sydney and use that as an incubator for these species, and from there the species could be relocated over time back …

  • 9 feb 2020
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