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government contracts

Street Furniture Australia is an approved supplier for the below contracts. 

 

Local Government Procurement NSW

LGP Approved contractor

LGP308-2: Playground, Open Space and Recreational Infrastructure 

Street Furniture Australia is an approved supplier of goods and services for open spaces, parks, gardens and playgrounds for Local Government Procurement, which represents NSW councils, not for profit organisations, universities, state government agencies and departments.

Term of Contract: 01/09/2013 – 31/08/17

 

Municipal Association of Victoria

MAV Certified Supplier

PP4924-2016: Provision of park and playground equipment, open space and recreational infrastructure, outdoor furniture, signage and related products & services

Street Furniture Australia is a preferred supplier of the Municipal Association of Victoria, which represents the state’s 79 councils.

 

Local Government Association of Tasmania

LGAT Logo

PP4924-2016: Provision of park and playground equipment, open space and recreational infrastructure, outdoor furniture, signage and related products & services

Street Furniture Australia is a preferred supplier of the Local Government Association of Tasmania, which represents 29 councils.

 

Local Government Association of South Australia
LGA Logo

BUS244-0314: Supply of Goods and Services for Open Spaces, Parks, Gardens & Playgrounds

Street Furniture Australia is a preferred supplier of the Local Government Association of South Australia for goods and services for open spaces, parks, gardens and playgrounds.

 

LocalBuy

Local Buy Logo

BUS244-0314: Supply of Goods and Services for Open Spaces, Parks, Gardens & Playgrounds

Street Furniture Australia is a LocalBuy supplier of goods and services for open spaces, parks, gardens and playgrounds for local and state government, universities and not-for-profits in Queensland.



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